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                   Reference materials and Tutorials

 

     Check this out! someone just sent us a link and it looks like a great starting point for a

homemade net gun!

http://www.instructables.com/id/Build_A_Net_Gun/

 

TITLE: Dress for duress

CATEGORY: Costumes

AUTHOR: KEVLEX 

 

    A costume should be designed to protect its wearer from the range of threats that his style of operation makes likely.

    It is tempting to design a suit to protect against everything imaginable, but it is simply not a viable strategy unless you have the resources to design and build a state of the art mechanical suit to carry the armor plating, lead plating, custom scuba gear, cooling system, etc, etc, etc, required for  protection against all conceivable threats.

    A well-trained, highly mobile Superhero might opt for minimal protection in order to avoid sacrificing speed and mobility, especially if his actions are well planned and he uses the element of surprise to full advantage.

    When choosing to incorporate protective measures into a costume, always carefully weigh the benefits and drawbacks of those additions and always test out the suit in non-emergency conditions: get geared up and do some housework, work out or go for a jog. A street fight is not the place to learn that you can't roll properly because your suit is too bulky, or that your arm guard is prone to catching on your utility belt, or that your helmet nearly renders you deaf. Work out any potentially fatal flaws before taking a new suit into action. Pinching and chafing can be very distracting.

     That being said, a few of the protective measures you might want to consider are:

     SOFT BODY ARMOR can be procured second-hand from various sources such as EBAY. Soft body armor usually protects against penetration from most handgun ammunition, but severe blunt trauma can still occur, sometimes  resulting in death.

     HARD BALLISTIC INSERTS can be added to soft body armor to provide protection from blunt trauma and higher velocity ammunition. They are not inexpensive, and they are generally not meant to be reused.  Hard inserts may, of course, further limit mobility.

     HARD BODY ARMOR is also available, however it is harder to find, more cumbersome  and much more costly. I have seen a solid ballistic vest that had been fired upon and it still looked like it was intact, although I am not an expert and am not sure what particular material it was made of.

     CUSTOM GARMENTS can be constructed, but be sure to research the materials you will be using! Kevlar fabric must be kept dry in order to do you any good! Make sure you are using a material designed for ballistic protection: not all Kevlar fabrics are suitable. waterproof coverings for Kevlar panels are essential! If you buy a second-hand vest, be sure to inspect the panels for integrity.

     Some of the ballistic fabrics require special cutting tools and this should be factored into your budget if required. I have been pricing Kevlar fabric and it is not inexpensive. The best price I have found is around $33.00 per yard and many layers are required for even the most basic level of protection. I have been reading  a lot about Dyneema, which appears to be superior to Kevlar, but I have not been able to find a source for the ballistic version: Dyneema UD. I assume it is quite expensive.

     It might be more cost effective, in some cases, to remove the soft Kevlar panels  from a second or third vest and put them into service protecting other areas, rather than creating custom panels from scratch.

    CHAIN MAIL: Good mobility, reasonably priced and decent protection from edged weapons. It is not much good against blunt weapons and is useless against firearms.

    Here is a link to good information on bullet-proofing:

    Modern Armor

 

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    If anyone knows of a source for small quantities of Dyneema UD Fabric, please E-mail me the link at VIKINGWIZARD(at)GMAIL(dot)COM That's all for now. Be safe.    

~KEVLEX~

PROTECTIVE COSTUME MATERIALS 

Contributed by: By Rob Mandeville  07/10/2007

Your discussion of costume materials include a lot about anti-ballistic armor.  An important question to ask is, for a given superhero, what is the real threat?  Certainly, some could come into gunplay situations at an alarming rate.  Crusaders aiming at less violent criminals (a good way to work one's way up to the big leagues without a detour to the morgue) would likely come across basic street fighting scenarios, possibly involving knives or sticks.

There is already a large industry in place to sell you armor against such attacks -- the sporting goods business.  American Football uniforms help 175-lb wide receivers  survive violent tackles by the Western equivalent to the Sumo wrestler, and get up for the next down.  Hockey equipment protects the wearer against a large rubber puck hitting you at over 100 mph, and must handle occasional bladed attacks (from skates) to boot.  And certainly, all this gear is built to allow full athletic movement.

If nothing else, it would be very smart to cover the eyes, lest a hero be brought down by a well-placed finger.  Both the sports and construction industries have many options for this protection.  Built to protect from everything from lacrosse balls to wood chips being thrown from a chainsaw, they should be more than enough to defend the eyes in a typical street brawl.


 

Gadgets

       

Stun Gun Schematic

Bunch of different sites have schematics, not sure which is best.

 

NET-GUN: ARTICLE

Not sure where to purchase these or how effective they are.

           

"Beeping" Tracking Transmitter

Tracking transmitter

Here are some links to free directions to construct homing devices. I would have just copied and posted the plans here, but was unsure about copyright restrictions.

 

Legal Issues

 

Indiana Citizen's Arrest Laws

SUBMITTED BY: Dark Knight. (THANKS!)

IC 35-33-1-4
Any person
     Sec. 4. (a) Any person may arrest any other person if:
        (1) the other person committed a felony in his presence;
        (2) a felony has been committed and he has probable cause to
believe that the other person has committed that felony; or
        (3) a misdemeanor involving a breach of peace is being
committed in his presence and the arrest is necessary to prevent the
continuance of the breach of peace.
    (b) A person making an arrest under this section shall, as soon as
practical, notify a law enforcement officer and deliver custody of the
person arrested to a law enforcement officer.
    (c) The law enforcement officer may process the arrested person as
if the officer had arrested him. The officer who receives or processes
a person arrested by another under this section is not liable for
false arrest or false imprisonment.
As added by Acts 1981, P.L.298, SEC.2. Amended by Acts 1982, P.L.204, SEC.7.


 

Secret Identities

Contributed by: By Rob Mandeville  07/10/2007

In the United States, one may refer to one's self by an unregistered name, even conducting business under that name, so long as there is no intend to defraud.  I had a college friend born as Brian Bikowicz (
www.megazone.org).  Due to events in his childhood, he has effectively "divorced his former self", and started referring to himself as Megazone (the name came from an anime called Megazone 23.  For years, he conducted business under the name Megazone, to the point of having credit cards in that name.  Years later, he legally changed his name to Megazone.  It is important to note that he has never denied that he is Brian Bikowicz.  He is a regular blood donor, and would have to tell the Red Cross every time that he has also donated blood under the name Brian Bikowicz.  The name is certainly skip-traceable, but that is beyond the interest of your average street thug.
            

Tutorials, links and articles on these topics may be submitted to:

VIKINGWIZARD(at)GMAIL(dot)COM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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